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Free Public WiFi access at Cafes – Government Guidelines/Regulations/Rules in India

The Government of India has guidelines for public WiFi access.

Muft Internet encourages cafes, bars, restaurants, hospitals etc. owners to provide WiFi the legal and safe way.

You can download Free Public WiFi access at Cafes – Government Guidelines/Regulations/Rules in India by clicking here

The user authentication system can also be considered as a ‘login validation system’ for those who want to access the wireless network for free Internet. A database of successfully logged in users is maintained through this system as per legal requirements.

Instead of handing out passwords on a piece of paper the Government recommended a WiFi User Authentication that generate SMS passwords delivered directly on the users phone number.

WiFi Authentication STEP 1: Capture MAC address and phone number.

 

Step 1: Enter user's mobile number
Step 1: Enter user’s mobile number

 

WiFi Authentication STEP 2: Generate Password and Deliver via SMS Gateway.

Step 2: Random Password Generation delivered via SMS on user's phone
Step 2: Random Password Generation delivered via SMS on user’s phone

WiFi Authentication STEP 3: Verify Password and allow access.

WiFi Authentication system in India (2)
Step 3: Validate user with rules of access (time, speed, downloads)

This is how it should work:

USER FLOW SYSTEM FLOW
User switches on his device WiFi and selects SSID. STARTS A NEW SESSION FOR THE USER, INITIATES USER LOGIN PROCESS
User’s device browser opens and loads login form. User enters mobile number INPUT USER ID
User ID is registered CHECK USER ID, REGISTER NEW USER IDS, GENERATE AND DISPATCH PASSWORD
User enters password that was received via SMS INPUT USER PASSWORD
User accepts terms of use USER AUTHORIZATION
User can now use Free Internet service SUCCESS PAGE

Remark: If you need more information on Muft Internet’s free-to-use WiFi User Authentication System that makes your wifi hotspot legally compliant; contact us on +91 22 699990235 or email jinesh at muftinternet.com

2500 cities in India to get #freeWiFi. However, it’s not completely free! #digitalindia

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Digital India initiative is likely to kick off with a big bang plan to roll out free Wi-Fi internet connections in 2,500 cities and towns across the country.

The roll-out will happen over the next three years through state-owned Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd, said a report in The Times of India, adding the plan will entail an investment of Rs 7,000 crore.

The free internet service will be available from the next financial year itself, will be available to subscribers of all  mobile networks and will offer speeds that will match that offered by 4G technology, BSNL chairman and managing director Anupam Shrivastava has told the newspaper here.

However, there will be cap on how much free internet users can enjoy before needing to pay for further data usage.

For those who have MTNL and BSNL connection, net access in another city will come with a nominal roaming charge, the report says.

The cities that will get the facility include Kolkata, Chennai, Lucknow, Dehradun, Hyderabad, Varanasi, Bhopal, Jaipur, Patna, Indore, Chandigarh and Ludhiana.

Digital India is a plan envisioned by Modi "to transform India into a digitally empowered society and knowledge economy". The key to the programme is turning high-speed internet into a core utility.

According to the information available with the Digital India website, the government plans to extend coverage of the information infrastructure nationally by March 2017 at a cost of Rs 15,686 crore.

The benefits of the roll-out of free Wi-Fi in 2,500 cities are likely to be two-fold, and as the report says, it will help the loss-making state-run BSNL and MTNL to turn profitable and secondly, internet businesses will see an unprecedented boom.

Turning around BSNL is in line with the much-talked-about Modi strategy of improving the efficiency level of loss-making or sick PSUs.

Of the internet-based businesses, e-commerce is likely to be the biggest beneficiary of the move. The boost to the sun-rise sector, which has seen many entrepreneurs starting up businesses over the last few years, will also indirectly help the economy as it increases the consumption demand. A revival in consumption is key to economic revival, which is expected to take place in the next two years or so.

However, everything depends on how fast the fiscally strained government will be able to find financial resources to invest in such a huge project.

via Modi's big-bang Digital India plan: 2500 cities to get free 4G-level wifi – Firstpost.

Internet connection @ Rs 10 per month starting this year! @narendramodi’s #digitalindia dream coming true!

“For as little as Rs 500 (appx. 9Euros) a month, Muft Internet will provide 50 people with Internet connection for 30 days.”

“That’s an Internet bill of RS.10 (appx. 10 cents) per person per month.”

“It will be possible to bring free wifi at almost every chai stall”

These claims have not been made by marketers. They have been made by Human Computer Interaction scientists, ex-IITians and investors.

Over the past 12 months, university students from 8 different countries have been working on a join research with it’s central topic as

“How do we bring more people from developing countries online?”

1 billion in India have never been online. India is one of the top IT exporters in the world yet it has one of the lowest internet users per capita.

Muft Internet - What is Muft Internet - Introduction to the Muft Internet Project (14)

This is when everyone started on a concept together. It’s now called MUFT WiFi hotspots.

MUFT WiFi hotspots – A free internet (WiFi) access point system that works with any ISP and can be used by EVERYONE for FREE INTERNET!

These hotspots will be available to public spaces for everyone to use. Advertisers can adopt a spot for as little as Rs. 10 per user per month.

They argue that their uniqueness lies in their break through technology and alternate pricing system.

Take a look at the price plan. It’s unique and doesn’t follow conventional ISP complexity.

pricing

It’s still unclear about which places will be the first to get MUFT WiFi. It would definitely take time to bring the remaining 85% of India online.

Check out the Muft WiFi hotspot page!

 

[Tweet “Internet connection @ Rs 10 per month starting this year! @narendramodi’s #digitalindia dream coming true! http://wp.me/p5neXD-kP”]

Government should involve local communities to enable #digitalindia

The central government needs to partner communities at the grassroots level and integrate the country’s vernacular component to make the Digital India initiative a success, an expert said here Friday.

“Whatever money it (Centre) is spending on culture, heritage conservation and preservation etc., it is always a very centralized activity. ”It is very, very essential to partner local communities,” T. Vishnu Vardhan, programme director (Access to Knowledge), The Centre For Internet and Society, Bengaluru, told IANS here. Vardhan was attending the 10th anniversary celebrations of Athe Bengali Wikimedia community at the Jadavpur University here. Aiming to turn the country into a digitally empowered society and knowledge economy, the Narendra Modi government has envisaged the Rs.1 lakh crore Digital India project.

Global IT giant Microsoft and Google have offered to help with the programme. Vardhan said that while going forward with the project, the Centre must integrate the vernacular components. Else it will be restricted to Delhi and metro cities. Access to culture on digitised platforms should not be limited, he observed. ”The current government talks about Digital India. But when you talk about digital India, the key thing that one needs to take into consideration is not the India but the Bharat — the vernacular imagination of India, the regional imagination of India. ”Otherwise whatever grand plans they have will only be limited to Delhi and other metropolitan cities,” said Vardhan.

He suggested that the central government take note of examples like Wikipedia’s regional language domains to further the Digital India project. ”Wikipedia or wikisource where you put up the original prints source in digitised form and make it searchable… these are the examples that the government should look at because these are done with the help of local volunteers who come from the remotest regions,” said Vardhan.

via Government should partner local communities in ‘Digital India’: Expert | Latest Tech News, Video & Photo Reviews at BGR India.

Andra Pradesh to get 15 Mbps broadband @ Rs 150/month #digitalindia

New Delhi, Jan 11: Andhra Pradesh government, led by tech-savvy Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu, plans to provide broadband connections with peak speed of 15 Mbps to twelve million households for as low as Rs 150/month in the first stage of its about Rs 5,000-crore optical fibre project.

The state government has asked the Centre to provide its share of funds from ongoing National Optical Fibre Project that aims to connect 2.5 lakh gram panchayats across the nation by December 2016.

“AP has asked the Centre for permission to execute the broadband project on its own. The state has requested for its share from funds earmarked by the Centre for NOFN project in the state. The Telecom Commission on January 7 accorded in-principle approval to the proposal with some riders,” an official source told PTI.

The Union Cabinet will take a final call on the project. Andhra Pradesh has proposed to deliver broadband connection with 10-15 mbps download speed to each 12 million households for Rs 150/month that are planned to be covered under state designed project, the official source added.

At the peak promised speed of 15 Mbps, an user can download video file equivalent to a standard bollywood movie in about 6 minutes.

Private telecom operators are at present providing broadband connection with similar speeds for about Rs 1,100 per month in the state. Andhra Pradesh has proposed to execute the project at cost of Rs 4,913 crore in 5 years while Centre has earmarked Rs 1,940 crore for the NOFN project in the state.

“The state has said that it will arrange remaining funds on its own,” the official said. For executing this project, the state will create its own corporation to be named Andhra Pradesh Fibre Corporation which would 100 per cent owned by state.

This corporation will manage the network and own the assets. The state will create another entity in name of ‘Digital Andhra Corporation’ using Public-Private-Partnership model that will be responsible for creation of ecosystem for broadband adoption.

via Andhra govt plans 15 Mbps broadband service at Rs 150/month – Oneindia.

Estonia – The world’s most digitally advanced country. Lot to learn for #digitalindia

estonia-the most digitally advanced country in the world

To understand how a society can completely transform itself by enabling internet access for its citizens, Estonia presents a great case study. Estonia, as a country with a population of 1.3 million, has one of the highest technology adoption rates with over 80% of citizens connected to the Internet as on 2013 (World Bank: Internet users (per 100 people), 2014). As Estonia declared Internet access as a human right in 2000 and took the necessary steps to increase Internet penetration with efforts like the Tiger Leap program[3] and EstWin[4]; Estonia enjoyed improved GDP and happiness index rankings. In less than 15 years, Estonia’s GDP grew by 4 times from 5.67 Billion USD in 2000 to 24.47 Billion USD in 2013. In 2013, over a fourth or 27% of services exported by Estonia were ICT based (Word Bank: GDP Ranking, 2014) amounting to 1.48 Billion USD (World Bank: ICT service exports (% of service exports, BoP), 2014). As of 2013, 99.6% of all banking transactions in Estonia were done online (Republic of Estonia – Information Systems Authority (RIA): Facts about e-Estonia, 2014) and in the 2011 elections 15.34% of eligible population voted online (Vabariigi Valimiskomisjon (VV): Statistics on eVoters, 2014).

Most Estonian (and world) researchers, academicians and general citizens believe that the Quality of Life in Estonia has improved as the country implemented and the necessarily ICT measures that transformed a crumpled post-soviet country into a highly advanced digital society.

Numerous studies have repeatedly shown how countries with higher adoption of Internet like Estonia have resulted in better educational systems, improved democracy and government services and higher economic development than countries that were late or non-adopters.

Estonia wasn’t a very early adopter. In fact they started investing most of their resources on ICT only after 2001.

On the other side of the planet; India, a developing country with a population of 1.3 billion or roughly 1000 times that of Estonia‘s, has one of the lowest technology adoption rates with only 15% of its population with access to Internet (World Bank: Internet users (per 100 people), 2014) and only about 5% of India’s service exports are ICT based (World Bank: ICT service exports (% of service exports, BoP), 2014). This may seem like small numbers in percentage but India has over 300 million+ internet users (the third largest digital population in the world) and its ICT exports amounts more than 100 billion USD. This is roughly 66x times that of Estonia’s ICT export.

As on January 2015, the sad truth remains that over 60% of the world population do not use the Internet.

As the non-users miss out on this basic human right, the online population of the world is losing out on their creativity and contribution. In a recent study conducted by Mckensy in collaboration with Facebook (on behlaf of Internet.org), it was stated that out of the 4.4 billion people in the world who lack internet 3.4 billion non-users come from just 20 countries (McKinsey & Company, 2014). What’s even more interesting is 2.3 billion or approximately 50% of the offline population come from just 5 countries – China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Bangladesh[5].

The huge digital divide in developing countries brought in a lot of corporate and governmental research into understanding the barriers of enabling internet access in people’s lives and measures on bridging this digital divide. Unfortunately, existing research focuses on this issue with a narrow lens of government bodies trying to plan infrastructure or telecom companies looking at how to increase coverage.

Neither of these two types of bodies have an approach like Estonia – „contextualization“ and „usability“ as a focus while planning or researching on how to increase internet adoption.

As Mcksennsy points out, In developing countries, the problems lie beyond hardware availability and network coverage. In what I consider as possibly one of the most important studies in understanding the nature of the digital divide, McKennsy’s extensive research pointed out that digital divide problems are affordability, contextualization, user capacity and infrastructure. (McKinsey & Company, 2014)

India has 840+ Million Cellphone users but only 300+ million internet users. Strangely, the world’s highest number of non-internet users come from the same country that produces some of the cheapest smartphones and has one of the widest network coverage by kilometer square in the world.

There is much our government and corporates can learn from Estonia for the #digitalindia program proposed by India’s prime minister – Narendra Modi. We don’t just need infrastructure – it’s time to educate, improve policies, address affordability, train teachers to use ICT etc.

Why India should declare Free Internet Access as a Human Right! #digitalindia #ICT4D

Slide8 Slide9 Slide14

Over the past few years and even today, it has been repeatedly pointed by researchers and NGOs through key World Development Indicators[1] that countries with higher internet penetration benefit with higher economic development, freer information and media communication, better educational and healthcare systems, improved democratic participation and overall Quality of Life[2] than the countries with low internet penetration.

The urgent need to bridge the digital divide has been recognized by he United Nations (Frank La Rue, 2011) and countries like Costa Rica (Human Rights Report: Costa Rica, 2011), Estonia (Facts about e-Estonia, 2014), Finland (Finland makes broadband a ‘legal right’, 2010), France (French Court Declares Internet Access ‘Basic Human Right’, 2009), Greece (Article 5, Constitution of Greece, 2008) and Spain (Sarah Morris, 2009); that have created frameworks and policies that consider Internet Access as a fundamental Human Right.

To understand how a society can completely transform itself by enabling internet access for its citizens, Estonia presents a great case study. Estonia, as a country with a population of 1.3 million, has one of the highest technology adoption rates with over 80% of citizens connected to the Internet as on 2013 (World Bank: Internet users (per 100 people), 2014). As Estonia declared Internet access as a human right in 2000 and took the necessary steps to increase Internet penetration with efforts like the Tiger Leap program[3] and EstWin[4]; Estonia enjoyed improved GDP and happiness index rankings. In less than 15 years, Estonia’s GDP grew by 4 times from 5.67 Billion USD in 2000 to 24.47 Billion USD in 2013. In 2013, over a fourth or 27% of services exported by Estonia were ICT based (Word Bank: GDP Ranking, 2014) amounting to 1.48 Billion USD (World Bank: ICT service exports (% of service exports, BoP), 2014). As of 2013, 99.6% of all banking transactions in Estonia were done online (Republic of Estonia – Information Systems Authority (RIA): Facts about e-Estonia, 2014) and in the 2011 elections 15.34% of eligible population voted online (Vabariigi Valimiskomisjon (VV): Statistics on eVoters, 2014).

Most Estonian (and world) researchers, academicians and general citizens believe that the Quality of Life in Estonia has improved as the country implemented and the necessarily ICT measures that transformed a crumpled post-soviet country into a highly advanced digital society.

Numerous studies have repeatedly shown how countries with higher adoption of Internet like Estonia have resulted in better educational systems, improved democracy and government services and higher economic development than countries that were late or non-adopters.

While users in some countries have been able to harness the potential of information technologies to thrive and become a major contender in today’s information economy, others have lagged behind as producers of low-value labor and products for wealthier nations. (Datta, 2011) Read more: http://muftinternet.com/openwiki/initial-literature-review/

25 cities in India to get #FreeWifi – Government plans for #digitalindia

NEW DELHI: Government is looking for a speedy rollout of Wi-Fi services at select public places in top 25 cities with population of over 10 lakh by June 2015.

"Government has plans to empanel 3-4 Wi-Fi service provider for speedy roll out of Wi-Fi hotspots across top 25 cities in the country by June 2015. The services will be available at select public places within these cities," according to an official source.

The project is part of Digital India programme under which the government aims to cover cities with population of over 1 million and tourist destinations with Wi-Fi services by December 2015.

Telecom firms may get three months time to complete rollout from the date they accept purchase order. The project is jointly being worked by the Department of Telecom and Ministry of Urban Development.

The government will facilitate permissions required from local authorities for network roll out.

The government has also separately identified 25 archaeological monuments to provide free Wi-Fi access, the source said.

These monuments include Humayun’s Tomb, Red Fort, Qutub Complex in Delhi, Taj Mahal, Fatehpur Sikri Sravasti and Sarnath in Uttar Pradesh, Shore Temple in Mahabalipuram, Vaishali-Kohua in Bihar, Martand Temple and Leh Palace in J&K, Konark Temple in Odisha, Rani-ki Vav Gujarat, Khajuraho and Mandu in Madhya Pradesh and Rang Ghar in Assam.

via Government to roll out Wi-Fi in 25 cities by June 2015 – The Times of India.

‘#DigitalIndia’s Optical Fibre Connectivity – Not Good Enough! via The Economic Times

India falls way short on connectivity backed by an optical fibre network, said chief of Sterlite Technologies, a company that makes power transmission and optic-fibre products. According to Anand Agarwal, capacity planning lags demand in India, not the other way round.

Only about 13-14% of India’s nearly four lakh telecom towers are connected through optic fibre, Agarwal said in an interview. An effective data network on fourth-generation technology requires 90-95% optic fibre for telecom towers.

In countries with highspeed Internet connectivity, there is a much wider opticfibre network. In the US or China, for example, Agarwal said there is over one billion kilometres of fibre on the ground.

“We expect India to have about 400 million kms by 2020… At the time the networks were put in place, the need was voice, even right now it is. But data consumption is on the minds of operators now, so there will be (optic-fibre) rollout,” Agarwal said. At present, the most aggressive laying of fibre optic cable is being carried out for the National Optic Fibre Network and by Reliance Jio Infocomm, added Agarwal.

Data capacity and quality of voice calling improve significantly when the towers are connected via optic fibre rather than over airwaves.However, laying the fibre involves digging of roads, or putting up infrastructure that require approvals of local bodies.

A streamlined policy for right of way to lay fibre underground is needed to increase and expedite the rollout, Agarwal said. He cited the example of the difference between Mumbai, where the approval costs Rs 60 lakh per km, and Delhi, where the cost is just seventh or eighth of that in Mumbai. Yet “operators are finding ways and business cases. Even then, laying is being undertaken in Mumbai, for example Jio is doing it,” he said.

Operators have expressed concern that with the National Optic Fibre Network project and a major rollout from Reliance Jio, there are inadequate contracts to lay more fibre and infrastruc ture. Agarwal is not on the same page, who said operators with smaller laying requirements such as Vodafone India or Idea Cellular may have to schedule rollout work to fit into leaner periods, but that build-out capacity was sufficient. Sterlite Technologies’ order book has been seeing some expansion. “Next year whether it will be 40% higher or 60% is difficult to say, but it will be growing,” he said.

At the start of the current quarter, the company had an order book of Rs 4,900 crore. It had revenue of Rs 592 crore, with operating profit of Rs 81 crore.

via ‘India lags behind in connectivity via optical fibre’ – The Economic Times.

The not so equal Internet – 74% of countries lack net neutrality rules!

The report led web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee to call for net access to be recognised as a human right.

The World Wide Web Foundation, led by Sir Tim, measured the web’s contribution to the social, economic and political progress of 86 countries.

Other headline findings from the report include:

62% of countries report that the web plays a major role in sparking social or political action

74% of countries are not doing enough to stop online harassment of women

The index ranked countries around the world in terms of:

universal access

relevant content and use

freedom and openness

empowerment

Four of the top five were Scandinavian, with Denmark in first place, Finland second and Norway third. The UK came fourth, followed by Sweden.

“The richer and better educated people are, the more benefit they are gaining from the digital revolution,” said Anne Jellema, chief executive of the World Wide Web Foundation, and the lead author of the report.

“Extreme disparities between rich and poor have been rightly identified as the defining challenge of our age, and we need to use technology to fight inequality, not increase it.”

One of the best starting points would be to put net access at the top of the agenda, she added.

Sir Tim said: “It’s time to recognise the internet as a basic human right.

“That means guaranteeing affordable access for all, ensuring internet packets are delivered without commercial or political discrimination, and protecting the privacy and freedom of web users regardless of where they live.”

Describing the web as a “great leveller” he said that rights to privacy, freedom of expression and affordable access should be “hardwired” into the basic rules of net use.

For the first time, the report looked at net neutrality, the principle that all web traffic should be treated equally.

It has been the focus of fierce debate in 2014, with the US mulling new laws that could create a two-tier internet – fast lanes for content providers prepared to pay for their services to be delivered faster.

The World Wide Web Foundation is calling on policy makers to introduce a raft of measures to fight net inequality.

They include:

Accelerate progress towards universal access by increasing number of affordable net services

Prevent price discrimination in internet traffic by treating the internet like an other public utility

Invest in high-quality public education to make sure that no-one is left behind with technological progress

Use the web to increase government transparency and protect freedoms of speech and privacy

Invest more to overcome key barriers in health, education, agriculture and gender equality

via BBC News – Net is ‘less free and more unequal’, says web founder.